You are hereBlogs / JuliaFuller's blog / Neurological Deficits Prevent FAS Child From Functioning at IQ Level

Neurological Deficits Prevent FAS Child From Functioning at IQ Level


JuliaFuller's picture

By JuliaFuller - Posted on 12 December 2008

After the public school tested my daughter’s IQ and pronounced her to be of average intelligence and capable of doing regular eight grade school work, we pursued private testing. I explained to the psychologist that the school said my daughter can do eighth grade work and does not need services. However, at 15 she is failing fifth grade work, even though she is given three attempts to pass it. The psychologist suggested that he test her for neurological deficits that may be preventing her from functioning at her IQ level.

My daughter has FAS. She has functioned below her chronological age since we first met her when she was four. When she came to live with us as a foster child, she couldn’t run, jump, speak intelligibly, use the toilet, or control herself. We adopted her at the age of six. While she attended public school, beginning at age four, she received speech and occupational therapy, as well as special education services. In fourth grade, the public school had her reading and spelling single syllable words and multiplying single digits. According to her IEP, she was cognitively impaired with an IQ in the 60s. Now, how do you go from that to a normal IQ and grade level schoolwork?

Yesterday, I had an opportunity to discuss the results of the testing with the psychologist. He confirmed that my daughter does have a low-average IQ now, I suppose thanks to four years of homeschool. However, the tests revealed severe neurological deficits. He explained that this adversely affects her short-term memory, concentration, and ability to process information. That of course, explains her inability to understand questions in her homework that seem simple to others. It also explains why she struggles daily with functioning.

I explained that she was taking 15mg of Zyprexa, 60mg of Straterra, and 20mg of Focalin to help her concentrate. So he dropped the bombshell, that at 15, she is probably at her optimum functioning level. At least with this documentation we may be able to seek guardianship of her when she reaches 18. With her inability to process decisions before making them, the world could be a very dangerous place for her. She sometimes steals, lies, and does whatever anyone tells her to do. She has also destroyed things,

Photo Credit: KevinKrejci

 

 

 

  • http://ouradopt.com/adoption-blog/nov-2008/juliafuller/homeschooling-spe... ">http://ouradopt.com/adoption-blog/nov-2008/juliafuller/homeschooling-special-child
  • Can My Learning Disabled Child Go to College Someday?
  • Homeschool Resources for the ADHD or Behavior Challenged Child
  • How to tell if your child has SPD Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Adopt for Free and Get Special Needs Adoption Income Tax Credit
  • Homeschool Resources for the Learning Disabled (LD) Child
  • How to Help an Older Child Stop Bedwetting

     

     

     

     

     

  •  

    John's picture

    Wow, that describes my 23 yo son, also FAS. At 20, he was much more capable of living and making rationalish decisions than now. 18 was better yet. The slippage is considerable, and there is a feeling that we won't get back to where he was at 18. Like all parents with a very disabled child, the question is what will become of him? He is sharp enough to know that he doesn't want his life to be this way. Parenting definately does not end at 18. John

    Julie's picture

    [So he dropped the bombshell, that at 15, she is probably at her optimum functioning level. At least with this documentation we may be able to seek guardianship of her when she reaches 18.]

    My daughter is almost 17 and has partial FAS. I have not found this to be true. I have applied and been turned down for services over and over because my daughters full scale IQ is 88. Our state laws legally define an adult with a developmental disability as, "any person age 18 or older who has been diagnosed as having significantly subaverage intellectual functioning existing concurrently with demonstrated deficits in adaptive behavior." With documentation of a normal IQ, my daughter will be eligible for zero services as an adult and I will not be able to establish guardianship.

    John's picture

    Julie, SSI (through Social Security) may be an option at 18. It is a different disability test. My son does not test below the normal IQ range, but does have condiditons that make him unable to make competent decisions, FAS being one of them. SSI allows him to pay for a psychiatric board and care that at least provides the minimum living assistance that he needs, it also provides Medicaid. They are likely to turn you down the first time, appeal and reapply. There isn't much out there, but that is one possibility. John