You are hereJohn

John


GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Tyler’s Perceptions on Adoption

Hi, my name is Tyler, and I’m 12. I came home two months ago from foster care. I am adopted with my Dad. These are my feelings on adoption.

I was feeling a little scared at first like any kid would be. Yes moving from foster care is scary. Yeah, you get used to legal documents for everything, but then you don’t because its adoption, no more paperwork. I’m still in the adjustment period but I’m getting use to LA. I’m used to hearing a lot of bad things about the city of LA. Like downtown gangs and drug dealers, but our city isn’t like that at all. It’s very quiet, I mean If you go to a nearby city there’s some parts anybody would want to avoid but others that are fine. Yeah, it is scary with an adoption, so if any kids are reading this you are not the only one. Trust me millions of kids have been adopted and yes it is scary that is my conclusion. So far adoption has been hard and easy, but my Dad and brothers have dealt with it, and helped to put it behind us. I think adoption can be a wonderful thing, but you need to be matched up with the right family.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Tyler, Coming Home, We Are Adopted

It is day two of Tyler’s visit to my home. Yes, last night’s refusal to take his shower and change for bed was testing. He woke up cranky, still wearing everything including his jacket, and needing a shower. I told him we could get going after his shower. He saw no point in that. After a bit he was up and ready to go, again, we can leave after your shower. More time, he appears in different clothes and his hair is wet. I smelled a rat. The towel was dry and so was the shower. Later, he appears in a towel, letting me know that the showerhead doesn’t work well. Water all over the floor, yes he had taken a shower. ODD? Yes, thank you.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Tyler Coming Home, Home Visit

My new, soon to be son, Tyler, called me this morning as he and his worker were driving south to Sacramento, where they would catch a flight to Long Beach. He started off with, “Hi Dad...” That was the first time he had called me that. They were on schedule. The worker had MapQuest directions, but the streets leading to our home are confusing. I talked Tyler through the route, there was the car, and my son was coming home for the first time. This is an unusual visitation, he would be with me for four days, on day five we would fly in my airplane to his city, where I would sign the adoption placement papers and then we would return home. Once he was out of the car, we would not be separated again.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Tyler, Coming Home, the Visit Second Day

Our guest blog is from John, a retired commercial airline pilot who has adopted four boys, and working on number 5, from domestic foster care as a single parent. John and his family live in southern California.

 

Night was the local fun center, just what we needed. Go Karts that we turned into bumper cars. He didn’t get my humor for a while. I would tap the rear of his kart and he would wobble, I would say ‘sorry’, of course, I didn’t mean it. He got it, and then it got interesting. We were enjoying each other, laser tag, a big hit, and miniature golf. Mr. Silent was long Gone. That night, many questions, about my sons, about adoption, about Los Angeles, about issues he had to deal with, and one that clearly puzzled him. “What about masturbation?” A gutsy question, most kids on a first visit would never have the guts to ask. When its OK, why its important, and no, its not an off limits topic. Lots of chance in his questions to make it clear that no matter what, he was OK. Sleep came easily for Tyler. I was getting to see all of my son, not just the easy to deal with parts. How spectacular, God does have a plan.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Tyler, Coming Home, the Visit First 24 Hours

Our guest blog is from John, a retired commercial airline pilot who has adopted four boys, and working on number 5, from domestic foster care as a single parent. John and his family live in southern California.

 

First meetings are scary. As a retired airline pilot, I can tell you that no emergency in the cockpit ever compared with the stress of a first meeting with a new child. It is so important, and you want so badly for it to go right. This would be my fifth first meeting. As usual, this was in the child’s area, I live 600 miles south.