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Out of home placement


JuliaFuller's picture

Choosing Out of Home Placement for RAD Child

You have decided that you cannot continue to live with your adopted RAD child. So what do you do next? Most states are not going to be supportive of a disrupted adoption and just take the child back into state custody. Most states do not voluntarily pay for long-term residential treatment for a RAD child, no matter how badly the child needs the intensive treatment. Most insurance companies will only pay for a few days and that is if your child is suicidal or threatening to kill someone in the family. If you have sufficient income to pay for residential treatment, thousands per month, then this is a great option for you and the child. Hopefully, your child will get the mental health services needed to work through the trauma that caused the RAD. The lack of a required bond between the rotating staff members allow the RAD child to thrive in the residential treatment environment. But if you cannot afford to pay for residential treatment, what can you do? When your sanity is at stake, the health and welfare of your family is at stake, what are your options.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Humpty Dumpty Had a Great Fall – 850 Miles Away, Is Dad Still There? Part 2

Another honest, real life, older child adoption guest blog from John. He is a retired commercial airline pilot who has adopted five boys, over three decades, from domestic foster care as a single parent. John and his family live in southern California.

Continued from Part 1. Every night he had to fill out a self report on his day. What did he do well, what went badly? What was most frustrating, etc. I was given a copy of them each week. Life was unfair; he was being blamed for things that weren’t his fault. The school sucked. The kids were damaged, and he wasn’t, and the staff was mean. There was another boy there that he truly disliked. Many nights his answer to “What did you do today that you were really proud of?” was, ‘I didn’t annihilate Kyle Goodman’. Kyle was two years older, and somewhat more beefy than Tyler, Kyle would not have been annihilated.

With each week there was progress. He was doing less and less deflecting responsibility, and more searching for answers. It was slow but steady. Nice even happened sometimes. We spent Thanksgiving and his birthday apart. We were going to spend Christmas night together, due to the schedule for the procedure that I needed to do with him.

Christmas night, I picked him up at 9PM, and we drove to the motel. On the way, he told me about something that really upset him.

GuestBlogger's picture

Guest Blog: Humpty Dumpty Had a Great Fall – 850 Miles Away, Is Dad Still There? Part 1

Another honest, real life, older child adoption guest blog from John. He is a retired commercial airline pilot who has adopted five boys, over three decades, from domestic foster care as a single parent. John and his family live in southern California.

Tyler had done what he had always been so good at, forcing a move, sixteen placements in five years of foster care. Now, after almost a year of adoption, attachment was happening, he had just forced another move. This time he was in a different state, many miles from home, about to start living in a therapeutic group home. The adoption was final, but Tyler was victorious, the move had happened, Dad was gone, or maybe Tyler was.

I have a Cessna 180 and flew up to his area the day after he arrived, It was beautiful flying weather. The director of the school met me at the airport and drove me to the school with all of Tyler’s belongings from the airplane. Not a large facility, a total of 20 boys, but very much out in the sticks. .